DOG FLU H3N2 NEWS REPORT UPDATE

DOG FLU H3N2 NEWS REPORT UPDATE

images-32

Animal Bond Radio Program Interview
Airing: 05/28/2015

Report Data: Cornell University of School Veterinary Medicine

April 24, 2015 Canine Influenza Spreading

Canine Influenza Virus Tests

April 12, 2015 Canine Influenza Update

H3N2: Frequently Asked Questions

Canine Influenza Virus Diagnostic Frequently Asked Questions

The AHDC has been involved in the identification of canine influenza virus (CIV) as the cause of a widespread outbreak of acute respiratory disease in the Chicago area. While other potential pathogens have been detected in some animals, the most frequent agent has been CIV. CIV was first identified as a factor in canine respiratory disease in 2004. The virus circulating in the US is a genetic variant of the H3N8 equine influenza virus. The key change in the virus was the ability for transmission of the virus from dog to dog. Virtually all dogs are susceptible to infection regardless of age or breed. In the intervening years, it has been the case that CIV is an infection that is initiated by close contact with an infected dog in a restricted space such as an animal shelter, day care center, or boarding kennel. Casual contact is less likely to be a factor mainly due to the relatively low amount of virus being shed by an infected dog. As is the case with all influenza viruses, there is the opportunity for changes in the virus that could affect transmission rates. It is for this reason that the AHDC continues to track these changes and determine whether new variants are more virulent.

Influenza virus infection in dogs follows a similar pattern to infections in other species. The onset of clinical signs will be 2-3 days post infection. Peak of virus shed is 3-4 days post infection and the presence of infectious virus declines rapidly with the onset of an immune response. Dogs coughing for > 10days are not infectious as the cough is due to damage to the respiratory tract epithelium. While in the past CIV infections in and of themselves have not shown a significant mortality rate, CIV infections as well as other respiratory viruses compromise the normal defenses of the lung permitting secondary bacterial pneumonias.

SAMPLING and SHIPPING INFORMATION

As with all respiratory viruses, it is critical to take samples for agent detection within a day or two of the onset of clinical signs which include runny nose, low grade fevers, and coughing. It is very uncommon, but this virus can be fatal in some dogs. Dogs showing clinical signs for >7 days should be tested for CIV by an antibody test as the virus itself will be undetectable in most cases. For rRT-PCR (real time PCR) or virus isolation, nasal or pharyngeal swabs are the samples of choice. Do not place swabs in bacterial transport media unless you are attempting to isolate a bacterial or mycoplasma infection. To detect viruses, swabs can be placed into a red-top blood collection tube with a few drops of sterile saline or viral transport media if available. If any animal should die from suspected influenza fresh lung tissue is the tissue of choice.

Samples should be shipped on packs and arrive chilled using a next day delivery. Check our website or this link

https://ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/docs/Shipping_Discount_Program_Information.pdf 

for on line ordering of shipping labels. The AHDC offers a canine respiratory PCR panel. This panel includes canine adenovirus, canine distemper virus, canine parainfluenza virus, canine respiratory coronavirus, canine pneumovirus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Mycoplasma cynos along with matrix influenza PCR. It is difficult to determine solely by clinical signs which respiratory pathogen is present in the dog; the respiratory panel is the best option. It is common to find multiple viruses in these environments and this panel will assist in finding those agents.

SAMPLING LATER IN COURSE OF DISEASE

Testing for antibodies specific for the H3N8 influenza virus is generally done using the standard influenza virus test of hemagglutination inhibition (HI). Antibodies to CIV develop rapidly and by 10 days post infection there is a significant antibody titer. In the absence of a history of vaccination, the presence of CIV antibodies following a clinical illness is highly correlated with CIV being part of the clinical event.

The ADHC at Cornell  has developed a serologic assay that detects antibodies to the newly identified H3N2 influenza virus. Veterinarians and pet owners should submit acute and convalescent serum samples and  request influenza HAI. Samples from dogs with respiratory disease will be tested for both H3N8 and H3N2-specific antibodies. Results will be provided for both assays for the same cost as the original H3N8 assay.

VACCINATIONS

Vaccines do exist for CIV. Both of the products offered are killed vaccines and two doses of the vaccines are necessary to develop an effective immune response. While the vaccines may not prevent an infection, they do reduce shed of the virus and the severity of clinical disease.

Additional information can be found on the CDC website (http://www.cdc.gov/flu/canine/ ) or contact the AHDC at Cornell University at 607.253.3900.

CDC canine flu fact sheet http://www.cdc.gov/flu/canine/index.htm.

CDC spotlight on the outbreak http://www.cdc.gov/flu/news/canine-influenza-update.htm

 

BREAKING NEWS: Data provided to the Animal Bond Radio News Bureau by Cornell University School of Veterinary Medicine 

 © Copyright 2015 All Rights Reserved

 

Posted in Animal Bond Radio | Leave a comment

H3N2 DOG VIRUS: Exclusive Interview with Cornell University Amy Glaser

H3N2 DOG VIRUS: Exclusive Interview
Cornell University Amy Glaser

Unknown-4

An exclusive interview with Amy Glaser of the American Veterinary Medical Association [AVMA] and Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. The program identified the H3N2 virus and explains the symptoms, veterinary care, identification, treatment and prevention. The program also identifies where the virus came from and how it is spreading – – is it a national epidemic?

Earlier this spring, hundreds of dogs in and around Chicago began showing signs of respiratory illness, which testing revealed to be caused by canine influenza. Further genetic testing revealed there was something unusual about this outbreak: It wasn’t the usual H3N8 strain of canine influenza that was making dogs sick; it was H3N2, a strain that had previously only been identified in Asia. To date, the virus has caused at least six deaths, and more than 1,000 illnesses, in the Chicago area and neighboring states. In this broadcast, Cornell University veterinarian Dr. Amy Glaser will talk about this newly introduced strain of dog flu and how pet owners can keep their dogs from becoming

Information provided to Animal Bond Radio News Bureau as of May 17, 2015.

Animal Bond Radio™ and The Talk of Animals™
Logo Graphic and Animal Bond Radio™  The Talk of Animals”™
are the Trademarks and intellectual property of
Frank T. Shane and Animal Bond Radio™
© Copyright 2015 All Rights Reserved
Posted in Animal Bond Radio | Leave a comment

H3N2 DOG FLU: How to keep your dog from being infected

Dog flu strain new to U.S. How pet owners can keep their dogs from being infected.

CLICK FOR H3N2 NEWS

An exclusive interview with Amy Glaser of the American Veterinary Medical Association [AVMA] and Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. The program identified the H3N2 virus and explains the symptoms, veterinary care, identification, treatment and prevention. The program also identifies where the virus came from and how it is spreading – – is it a national epidemic?

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association on the AVMA Podcast with Dr. Amy Glaser of Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine (vet.cornell.edu): Source: www.AVMA.org

Earlier this spring, hundreds of dogs in and around Chicago began showing signs of respiratory illness, which testing revealed to be caused by canine influenza. Further genetic testing revealed there was something unusual about this outbreak: It wasn’t the usual H3N8 strain of canine influenza that was making dogs sick; it was H3N2, a strain that had previously only been identified in Asia. To date, the virus has caused at least six deaths, and more than 1,000 illnesses, in the Chicago area and neighboring states. In this broadcast, Cornell University veterinarian Dr. Amy Glaser will talk about this newly introduced strain of dog flu and how pet owners can keep their dogs from becoming infected.

Information provided to Animal Bond Radio News Bureau as of May 22, 2015.

Animal Bond Radio™ and The Talk of Animals™
Logo Graphic and Animal Bond Radio™  The Talk of Animals”™
are the Trademarks and intellectual property of
Frank T. Shane and Animal Bond Radio™
© Copyright 2015 All Rights Reserved
Posted in Animal Bond Radio | Leave a comment

Canine Virus H3N2: Multiple Deaths – Prevention to Avoid Epidemic

Animal Bond Radio News Bureau
Posted: 05-27-2015

images-39

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CORNELL UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE and the University ANIMAL HEALTH DIAGNOSTIC CENTER has been involved in the identification of Canine Influenza Virus. H3N2 is a new flu strain and is the cause of a widespread outbreak of acute respiratory disease in the Chicago area.

A few weeks ago, hundreds of dogs in and around Chicago began showing the symptoms of this respiratory illness. Testing revealed it to be caused by canine influenza. Further genetic testing revealed there was something unusual about this outbreak: It wasn’t the usual H3N8 strain of canine influenza that was making dogs sick; it was H3N2, a strain that had previously only been identified in Asia. As of this Animal Bond Radio News Report, the virus has caused multiple deaths, and more than 1,000 illnesses, in the Chicago area and neighboring states. It may be spreading, but reporting in the United States is in most states voluntary. Frank Shane interview Dr. Amy Glaser from the Cornell University School of Veterinary Medicine and the Animal Health Diagnostic Center.

The one-hour broadcast will be aired May 30 2015 on AnimalBondRadio.com and iTUNES. Dr. Amy Glaser talks about this newly introduced strain of dog flu and how pet owners can keep their dogs from becoming infected.

Background Data as provided to Animal Bond Radio News Bureau:

The canine influenza outbreak afflicting more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and other parts of the Midwest is caused by a different strain of the virus than was earlier assumed, according to laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin. Researchers at Cornell say results from additional testing indicate that the outbreak is being caused by a virus closely related to Asian strains of influenza A H3N2 viruses, currently in wide circulation in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations since being identified in 2006. The following is a list of Frequently Asked Questions about H3N2. The answers are based on what we know to date.

Does H3N2 pose a risk to humans? Is there any chance it will jump to cats or other small pets?

At this time there are no known cases of this influenza virus infecting humans, though authorities such as the CDC are monitoring the situation closely.

This subtype of the virus was found to be the cause of disease in a number of cats in South Korea in 2010. At this time no cats in the US have been diagnosed with H3N2. For now, similar precautions for dogs should be followed. There is no vaccine available for cats.

 Will the vaccine developed for H3N8 protect against H3N2?

Although both are H3 viruses, H3N2 is antigenically different from the H3N8 virus strain, so it is likely to be seen differently by the immune system. While the H3N8 vaccine may offer some protection against the H3N2 virus, how much protection—if any—remains unknown.

How can owners protect their pets?

Owners should check with their veterinarian to find out if the influenza virus has been a problem in their area. If the dog is deemed to be at increased risk, it may be prudent to keep the dog out of situations where contact with other dogs can occur.

Care should be taken when handling a dog that has respiratory disease. Contaminated objects such as leashes and toys can spread the virus from one dog to another, as can people who have touched an infected dog.

What kinds of dogs are most at risk for H3N2?

As with H3N8, dogs at most risk are those that have contact with other dogs, particularly those that are having symptoms of a respiratory infection.

Situations that pose risk include boarding kennels, grooming salons, canine daycare, dog parks, animal shelters, and any other locations where dogs can interact.

As with other infectious diseases, extra precautions may be necessary with puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs that are immunocompromised for any reason. Especially severe disease has been seen in some groups of greyhounds.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms are respiratory in nature and can vary from dog to dog. Some have no symptoms while others become severely ill. Most dogs are only mildy affected with a fever, runny nose, and a cough. Others can suffer from life-threatening pneumonia.

For more information: http://AHVC.Vet.Cornell.edu

Consult your Veterinarian

Information provided to Animal Bond Radio News Bureau as of May 27, 2015

Animal Bond Radio™ and The Talk of Animals™
Logo Graphic and Animal Bond Radio™  The Talk of Animals”™
are the Trademarks and intellectual property of
Frank T. Shane and Animal Bond Radio™
© Copyright 2015 All Rights Reserved
Posted in Animal Bond Radio | Tagged | Leave a comment